Friday, December 1, 2017

#anAWWyear - November 1947: Food

We've hit November and the weather is heating up, so naturally we have gelatine

Australian Women's Weekly, Nov 1 1947, p 45
I decided to try making one of these 'Ice-Box cakes' from a Davis Gelatine advertisement.
Look at those ivy leaves!
Australian Women's Weekly, Nov 1 1947, p 47 
There are two parts to this recipe - each of the variations starts with lining of the tin (I used a loaf tin as that was closest to the illustration) with a sugar, melted butter and crumb mix. I used the cornflakes suggested and my four year old had an awesome time crushing them in a bag.
"ICE BOX CAKE is made in a plain mould or cake tin. Cover the bottom and sides with a crusty mixture (see below), then fill with a delicious confection (see our recipes).Chill for 12-24 hours-do not freeze - unmould, cut and eat - enjoy.
CRUSTY COVERING: Melt 2 tablespoons butter, add 1½ cups brownsugar, cook for a few minutes till smooth, add 2 cups crushed cornflakes, biscuit or wafer crumbs. Mix well, press to the bottom and sides of the mould. Chill for 20 minutes or longer, then fill. Unmould by placing in warm water."  
The variation I tried used marshmallows and fruit - I used bananas, as I had them, and used both pink and white marshmallows. 
"3 teaspoons Davis Gelatine dissolved in 3 tablespoons hot water, ¼ lb. marshmallows, ¾ pint milk, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons sugar, vanilla essence, 2 cups fruit such as sliced bananas, peaches, apricots, 1 cup cornflake crumbs or wafer biscuit crumbs (measurements level).
Cut marshmallows in quarters, place in saucepan with 3 tablespoons of milk. Let stand. Beat egg yolks and sugar, add to balance of milk, cook until thickening slightly. Cool. Add dissolved gelatine. Warm marshmallows, melt slightly. Beat egg whites, fold into the marshmallow and fold lightly into the custard mixture. Arrange in the prepared mould in alternate layers with fruit and wafer crumbs. Chill."
I'm not 100% sure the measurement is 3/4 pint of milk, because the font is small, italic and at an angle on the page, but less than that didn't seem right for the amount of egg yolk.
My IceBox Cake. No Ivy
The texture was a bit weird, honestly, and neither my husband or I really liked it. I then froze it to see if that improved it at all, and I did enjoy that a bit better. Still not something I will make again.

Another feature was on using tinned foods, and I experimented with their 'Meat and Potato Puff'.

Australian Women's Weekly, Nov 15 1947, p 41
"MEAT AND POTATO PUFF
Two cups mashed potato, 2 eggs, good ½ cup milk,  1 teaspoon minced onion, 1 dessertspoon diced parboiled red pepper, salt and pepper to taste, 1 12oz. tin luncheon meat.
Add milk and egg-yolks gradually to mashed potatoes. Mix in onion, red pepper, salt and pepper, diced luncheon meat. Fold in stiffly beaten egg-whites. Turn into greased oven
ware dish, stand in tin of hot water, bake 40 to 45 minutes in moderate oven (375deg. F.) until lightly browned on top. Serve hot, garnished with parsley sprigs and tomato slices. For four or five."
As it came out of the oven.

Served with parsley. 

While this was fairly tasty and I thought could be a comfort food type of dish, my husband didn't think it was so different from just mixing stuff into mashed potato - he thought the 'puff'-ness didn't come through.

Last recipe this month was a reader submitted one for Orange Gingernuts.
"ORANGE GINGER NUTS
Half cup sugar, 1 tablespoon golden syrup. 2oz. margarine or butter, 1 egg, grated rind of 1 orange, 1½ cups self-raising flour, 1 dessertspoon ground ginger, pinch salt.
Warm sugar, golden syrup, and margarine or butter until melted, mix well. Cool, add beaten egg and orange rind. Fold in sifted flour, ginger, and salt. Roll into small balls, place well apart on greased tray, flatten with a fork. Bake 15 to 20 minutes in moderate oven (350 deg. F). Allow to cool on tray."
Orange gingernuts, with enthusiastic fork pressing from my four year old. 
My son also helped me make these, but sadly he refused to eat more than a bite because they were 'too spicy'. They are a strongly flavoured ginger nut and I adored them. 

3 comments:

  1. Hi Rhiannon,

    Love your blog with all the lovely vintage items you share!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! Glad you are enjoying it.

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  2. Well the first two recipes obviously aren't for me but orange ginger nuts sound fabulous!

    ReplyDelete